Take it as you will.

378 notes &

forestferncreations:

forestferncreations:

Forest Fern Creations’ September Give-Away

Just a fun give-away to celebrate my shop reopening on October 1st. Thank you all for the continual love and support. 

Same rules apply as usual.

You must be a USA citizen to win.

Reblogs count only and you must not delete this text.

You must be following me.

You must be over 18 years of age.

What you win:

Yucca seed pod slice

Small crochet doily

Three ostrich feathers artificially dyed

A small preserved rabbit foot

A bunch of organic raw mohair with lace

A print of an old photo

Two bones

Broken crab claw

Mushroom specimen

Shell piece

Bundle of basil grown in my garden with vintage lace

Black seed and rusted bottle cap earrings

Seed pod necklace made with wasp nest and moth wing

Thank you all again and winners will be picked on October 1st! <3

For those who missed yesterday!

(via forestferncreations)

0 notes &

Saw two beautiful little rodents today while at work. SO bummed that i couldn’t grab them :c

419 notes &

rhamphotheca:

Indian pipe is an unusual wildflower. 
Indian pipe (Monotropa uniflora) doesn’t have chlorophyll, the stuff that makes plants green. Chlorophyll is necessary for photosynthesis, the process by which plants use sunlight to produce energy. Since it lacks chlorophyll for photosynthesis, Indian pipe has no need of sunlight and is able to grow in the darkest areas of the forest.  Many people mistake Indian pipe for a fungus, but it’s actually a perennial flower. However a soil fungus is vital to the plant’s survival. Indian pipe has roots that tap into a mycorrhizal fungus growing in the soil. The fungus forms a connection between the Indian pipe’s roots and nearby tree roots, and transfers some of the energy the trees produce through photosynthesis to the Indian pipe. Without this soil fungus, the Indian pipe plant would not be able to survive.Photo by C. Hoyer
(via: Great Smoky Mountains National Park - CO)

rhamphotheca:

Indian pipe is an unusual wildflower.

Indian pipe (Monotropa uniflora) doesn’t have chlorophyll, the stuff that makes plants green. Chlorophyll is necessary for photosynthesis, the process by which plants use sunlight to produce energy. Since it lacks chlorophyll for photosynthesis, Indian pipe has no need of sunlight and is able to grow in the darkest areas of the forest.

Many people mistake Indian pipe for a fungus, but it’s actually a perennial flower. However a soil fungus is vital to the plant’s survival. Indian pipe has roots that tap into a mycorrhizal fungus growing in the soil. The fungus forms a connection between the Indian pipe’s roots and nearby tree roots, and transfers some of the energy the trees produce through photosynthesis to the Indian pipe. Without this soil fungus, the Indian pipe plant would not be able to survive.

Photo by C. Hoyer

(via: Great Smoky Mountains National Park - CO)